CA Solving Illegal Immigration by Bad Economy

Friday, July 29, 2011

How long will it be until Mexico starts having an illegal immigrant problem?  Maybe we should hold up on that border fence idea a little longer...

It appears that all the anti-economy legislation being passed by the geniuses in Sacramento has had an interesting side-effect: Illegal imigrants are reportedly leaving California to return home to Mexico where their prospects are better.


There are fewer undocumented immigrants in California – and the Sacramento region – because many are now finding the American dream south of the border.

"It's now easier to buy homes on credit, find a job and access higher education in Mexico," Sacramento's Mexican consul general, Carlos González Gutiérrez, said Wednesday. "We have become a middle-class country."

Mexico's unemployment rate is now 4.9 percent, compared with 9.4 percent joblessness in the United States.

1 comments:

Euripides said...

Ah! What a sneaky plan by the government of the Socialist Republic of California. I'm uncertain, however, how the benefits of fewer illegal immigrants outweigh the destruction of California's economy....

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