3 Major Polls Confirm: Number of Americans Opposing "Gay Marriage" Increasing

Friday, July 17, 2009

Despite the many sucesses of "same-sex marriage" advocates in the media, courtrooms and state legislatures across the nation in forcing the majority of Americans to accept the drastic redefinition of marriage in the name of promoting the homosexual agenda, three major polls (Pew Foundation, Gallup, CBS News/New York Times) clearly show that there is an ever widening majority of people who are increasingly opposed to the idea. Every time the people of a state have been allowed to vote on the issue, they have clearly indicated that they want marriage to be left as it is.

Brian Brown from NOM:

Do you realize how revolutionary this news is? These polls turns the conventional wisdom on its head. Gay marriage is inevitable, "they" say, and the media trumpet; there are no arguments against it. But the truth is very different: After six years of public scrutiny and debate, gay-marriage advocates have failed to persuade the American people. And that's in spite of the mainstream media, in spite of the recent court decision, in spite of the massive top-down push to ram gay marriage through blue-state legislatures in New England.

The effects of this demographic reversal of what gay advocates had hoped is quite promising to saving the institution of marriage:

Maybe you have already heard about the big joint statement by Equality California and two other gay rights groups: They will not try to get an amendment overturning Prop 8 on the ballot in 2010. They urge other gay-marriage supporters to abandon the attempt. Why? Because they are afraid they will lose. According to the LA Times, Ron Buckmire, president of one of the groups which signed the joint statement, said he made his decision after his group went door to door to talk to voters about same-sex marriage in South Los Angeles. "It was a huge success. We had 70 volunteers, working for five hours, knocked on 1,200 doors," he said. And yet after that massive effort, how many hearts and minds were they able to change? Just 50 people, Buckmire said. "Do the math."

There is, however, increasing indications that gay marriage advocates will attempt to go to the Federal Supreme Court to overrule the people's will and impose gay marriage on them. Supreme Court Justice nominee Sonya Sotomayor has quite a background of decisions imposing her own political views of social justice over the democratic will of the nation, but she is keeping quiet and attempting to appear moderate during the latest hearings in congress:
But Judge Sotomayor suddenly clammed up at the oddest moments. Sen. Chuck Grassley raised the issue of DOMA [the Defense of Marriage Act]. And then Sen. Lindsey Graham tried to get her to say something, anything, about how she and the Supreme Court should decide what is a "fundamental right." Graham pointed out the disparity: Ask the good judge about, say, "stare decisis" and she can ramble on at length. Ask her how the Supreme Court decides what a "fundamental right" is... and suddenly she can't say anything at all?Judge Sotomayor wasn't going to say anything at all that might clue the American people in to her views. As NOM president Maggie Gallagher told the press, "By refusing to answer basic questions about her views of the Constitution, Judge Sotomayor is not displaying the kind of honesty we expect from judges. All Americans who support marriage as the union of husband and wife--and every American who treasures democracy and freedom--has reason to be concerned."
Still, as Brian Bron illustrates, there is always hope because reason and nature demands that society support the institution that was designed to secure our children their rights to a mother and a father committed to eachother and to raising that child:

I had my first quintessential Washington moment this week. I was sitting actually in a smoke-filled room (literally! cigars!) talking on the phone about the harassment and intimidation people who speak up for marriage face. The guy sitting next to me, a distinguished-looking man of 70 years or so, says to me, "Excuse me, I couldn't help overhearing you. Can I talk to you about this marriage thing?"

I move over to chat. I explain why marriage matters--it's a universal human social institution, necessary in a way that no other relationship is. When a baby is born, I tell him, there's bound to be a mother somewhere close by, but marriage is how we attach the father to the mother-child bond, so we can make sure men live up to our responsibilities in family and in society. That struck a big chord. "You are right," he said, "Men are promiscuous." (That's his words, not mine!) "Thank you," he tells me, "I never heard that argument before; that makes a lot of sense."

Meanwhile, this being a Washington scene, every now and again we were interrupted by folks who wanted to say a few words to my new friend. I couldn't help noticing that they kept addressing him as "Congressman.""I'm a Democrat," he told me. "I'm not going to vote with you on most things, but this gay marriage thing... maybe that goes too far."Truth is powerful. The only way they can win is if they succeed in silencing and intimidating us.

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