Obama Tells Terrorists "You Have the Right to Remain Silent"

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Hmmm . . . Bush was interested in getting the information out of the terrorists we have captured to prevent attacks and save American lives. Obama is interested in their Constitutional Rights?!! Hello! We are never going to get the information we need to stop emminant terrorist attacks if we tell them to remain silent! The constitution doesn't apply to non-citizens . . . especially those trying to kill Americans. I think that once we've gotten the information we need, those people should be shot on the spot. (That's what our founding fathers did with pirates, their form of terrorists.)

The Obama Administration has ordered the FBI and CIA to inform terrorists overseas that they "have the right to remain silent" before probing them for information to save American lives.

According to Weekly Standard report by Stephen F. Hayes, a senior Republican on the House Intelligence Committee has revealed that "the Obama Justice Department has quietly ordered FBI agents to read Miranda rights to high value detainees captured and held at U.S. detention facilities in Afghanistan."

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