San Francisco Retaliates For Prop-8 By Taxing Church

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

The city of San Fransisco has taxed the Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco $15 million in property transfer taxes following an internal restructuring of the archdiocese, claiming that no viable exemptions could apply to the church. They claim an internal restructuring of property in a church is a "sale," something no one has before dared claim.

Phil Ting, the Gavin-Newsome appointed assessor responsible for this outrageous tax, supported the September 5th "Join the Impact" protest which called for taxes against pro-prop-8 churches. He spoke out against Proposition 8 at an API news conference, where he called on everyone to "fight and stand up for what's right." He attended a fundraiser hosted by the mayor to counter prop-8. His name appears on a google cache as having donated to Equality California PAC against Prop 8.

This apparent retaliation against the Catholic Church for supporting the proposition is not surprising. Religion is the target for these militants, sweeping away constitutional rights. Just yesterday Assemblyman and gay activist Ammiano joked that anti-prop-8 Gov. Schwarzennager found him a place to live with a "nice Mormon family."

Source: Lifesitenews

1 comments:

Euripides said...

What a pathetic political ploy and proof that the real haters voted against Prop 8.

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